The Collected Poems of John William Corrington

Collected Poems

by John William Corrington
Edited by Joyce H. Corrington
Introduction by Jo LeCoeur

Book Description
During his lifetime, John William Corrington (1932 – 1988) published four books of poetry, but many of his poems that appeared in “little magazines” and journals were never collected. The Collected Poems of John William Corrington now makes all of Corrington’s published poems and a number of completed but previously unpublished poems available to readers. The poems appear in roughly chronological order with a bibliography that acknowledges prior publications.

And Wait for the Night by John William Corrington

And Wait for the Night

by John William Corrington

Book Description
It is said that the winner writes the history, but it’s also true that the loser is free to use fiction to present the case for the defeated. John William Corrington, a noted Southern writer, published And Wait for the Night, his first novel, in 1964, near the one hundredth anniversary of the end of the American Civil War. As the novel begins, he describes the fall of Vicksburg, Mississippi to show the agony of the defeat of the Army of the Confederate States by the overwhelming might of the Federal Army. But And Wait for the Night is not primarily about the war. It is about Reconstruction, the twelve-year occupation of the Confederate States that followed their defeat. Corrington’s dramatic example of this is the occupation of Shreveport, Louisiana, by the arrogant uniformed Yankee conquerors, both white and black, and their plundering civilian companions, the carpetbaggers. During the Civil War, one out of every five Southern families lost a husband, father or son. Under Reconstruction, the surviving Southerners found their Confederate money worthless, their land taken for unpaid taxes, and their civil government replaced by military fiat. And there was one further loss: the communal agreement that a Southerner should live his life with honor. Without any hope of redress by day, the survivors forgot their honor and responded by forming secret societies that waited for the night to take vengeance against their oppressors. Major Edward Malcolm Sentell, a paroled CSA officer, tires to maintain his honor but finds himself despised by his fellow Southerners and helpless to stop the looming conflict between them and the occupying Federal forces.

The Upper Hand by John William Corrington

The Upper Hand

by John William Corrington

Book Description
John William Corrington is a noted Southern writer of poetry, fiction, film and television. The Upper Hand, his second novel, chronicles the tale of Christopher Nieman, a young Catholic priest who loses his faith. Christopher descends La-Bas, into the New Orleans French Quarter. There he encounters some of its disturbing denizens: a drug dealer, an addict, a prostitute, a pornographic movie maker, and a Mississippi deputy sheriff who is running from his past. Will Christopher be able to find his way out of this modern hell and recover his faith? A warning: The Upper Hand, while dealing seriously with the difficulty of maintaining faith in God in the modern world, is extremely irreverent and may offend religious readers.

The Bombardier by John William Corrington

The Bombardier

by John William Corrington

Book Description
The Bombardier spans the years between World War II and the riotous events of the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. In it, novelists John William Corrington explores the motivations behind today’s political upheavals by telling the story of five young men, from very different backgrounds, who are trained as bombardiers during World War II. Assigned to the European theater, the bombardiers use their skills to destroy military targets, killing thousands—but it is the morally questionable firestorm they helped create which destroyed Dresden and killed 235,000 civilians that most affects them after they return to America. “When they came home, the seeds of later violence, of Final Solutions to all problems, was sown within them.” Two decades later the former bombardiers, now middle-aged men pursuing different careers, react in different, but characteristic, ways when they encounter the riots, demonstrations, and discontent of the anti-war protesters who assembled at the 1968 Democratic Convention.